Wednesday, 12 December 2007

Methods of taking cocaine

Snorting cocaine is the most common method of taking cocaine powder. This is ususally done by ‘racking’ it up into "bumps", "lines" or "rails" of very fine particles. A sharp object such as a razor blade or Stanley knife blade is often used for cutting the cocaine as fine as possible. The finer the coke is, the more coke can be obtained from the bag. After the lines are set out a funnel is used to sniff the line up the nose. Once again, money notes are often used for this purpose. In comparative terms, this probably the lowest risk method of taking cocaine, yet there are considerable risks associated with it still. A study by Bonkovsky and Mehta published in Am Acad Dermatol (2001 Feb;44(2):159-82) reported that, just like shared needles, the sharing of straws used to "snort" cocaine can spread blood diseases such as Hepatitis C. Cocaine can be snorted, smoked, or injected. Each of these methods of administration pose great risks to the user.

Evidence suggests that users who smoke or inject cocaine may be at even greater risk of causing harm to themselves than those who snort the substance. For example, cocaine smokers also suffer from acute respiratory problems including coughing, shortness of breath, and severe chest pains with lung trauma and bleeding.


When people smoke the kind of 'coke' that was prepared for snorting, the toxic effect they feel is caused not by the cocaine, but by a poisonous compound that forms, called cocamine. This is mostly done with the small amounts of cocaine remaining on a surface after snorting session.


Crack cocaine


A less sophisticated but common method is to use a discarded soda can and puncture several small holes on the side of the can near its bottom. " As the "rock" is heated, it melts and heats into vapor, which the user inhales as smoke.


A small piece (approximately one inch) of clean heavy copper or occasionally stainless steel scouring pad—often called a "brillo" or "chore", from the scouring pads of the same name—is placed into one end of the tube and carefully packed down to approximately three-quarters of an inch. Upon injection, cocaine reaches the brain in a matter of seconds, and the exhilarating rush that follows can be so intense that it induces some users to vomit uncontrollably which causes bleeding of the esophagus.

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